Question

'What time do you have?'

Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 03/11/13

Usually, if we want to learn what time it is, we ask, 'What time is it?' But I've heard this question: 'What time do you have?'

Is it common to use this question instead of 'What time is it?' or 'What's the time?'

The reply will be: 'I have ... o'clock'?

Are there any other ways of asking the time?

Answers

3

How Many Ways Can I say…?

There are lots of variable ways to ask and answer questions regarding time. Give them lots of options and provide lots of examples. Some of those are:

  • What time do you have?
  • What time does ------- start/finish/?
  • What time is it?
  • Do you know the time?
  • Do you know what time it is?
  • What time do you….. (do something—wake up, go to sleep, etc.)
  • When is the movie/class/concert/etc.?

Source: http://busyteacher.org/10671-what-time-do-you-have-telling-time-activities.htmlThis link is intended for teachers to make use of it :)

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 03/11/13

Thank you, Ghadeer!
1

As a native English speaker (Australian/British) I find “What time do you have?"  unusual. As previously mentioned, this is  American English and something you would most likely never hear outside of the US. 

To me it almost sounds like you are wanting to confirm the time with a second source (person), as if you want to check the time is correct.



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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 18/09/17

Thank you, Nick!

1

What time is it?

Can you tell me the time? (to which, those amongst us who are perverse, can simply answer"Yes!")

Do you have the correct time? is a possible but the concept of having the time still sounds a bit American to me. (The answer could again be just Yes!

Sorry but I'm not more inspired than that

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 04/11/13

Thank you, Paul! It's interesting to know the difference between British and American English.
1

Here in SE Pennsylvania it is not unusual to ask, "What time do you have?" or "Do you have the time?"

If I didn't see a clock anywhere myself, but saw that the other person was wearing a watch, I'd actually be more likely to ask "What time do you have?" than "What time is it?"

If I wanted to ask someone the time, but wasn't sure whether or not the person had a watch, I'd be more likely to ask, "Do you have the time?" The other person could respond, "No, sorry," or he could look at his watch and say, "Yes, it's 3:00." Or, if he didn't want to sound quite so authoritative and definitive, he could leave open the possibility that his watch might not be perfectly correct, and say, "Yes, I have 3:00."

Some people accompany the question with a gesture, pointing at their wrist, where a watch would be, if they were wearing one.

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 03/11/13

Thank you, Richard!!!!! You know, I just would like to thank all of the English-speakers who are kind to us and answer our questions. It is really interesting to learn the differences in American and British English.
1

What time do you have? - is American. Nobody in the UK would normally use this.

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 03/11/13

Aha, now, I see. Thank you!

Richard Detwiler Richard Detwiler (0) on 03/11/13

As an American it naturally sounds quite normal to me. What are some ways, Paul, that we can ask someone the hour in British English?

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