Question

To use or not to use 'on' before the names of the days of the week

Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 16/08/13

Usually, days of the week are written with the preposition 'on'. But sometimes, in news reports, I see that 'on' is omitted. For example, 'Most of the goods were sold Wednesday'. When is it possible not to use the preposition ? Or is it safer :) to write or say 'on' before the names of the days?

Answers

2

Now a days there is a growing tendency to use time nouns as adverbial objectives without preposition. Both usages are fine, but without preposition is finer because languages like rivers change courses for ease and need.

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2

It has nothing to do with "laziness."

The "on-less form is quite common, if not more common, in casual speech and is used in other contexts and registers, as well.

Most day-of-the-week and similar time phrases have no preposition:

  • Last Monday
  • Next Monday
  • Tomorrow
  • Yesterday, etc.

It is a natural progression to also simplify phrases like "on Monday" to "Monday" in a parallel manner.

In fact, the word "tomorrow" used to be "on the morrow" and has changed to the single-word form we know today. That was not due to laziness, but simply the normal change languages undergo.

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 17/08/13

Thank you, Mark!

Gora Lorca Gora Lorca (0) on 09/02/16

Is it correct to omit 'on' when the day includes times like night, morning or noon? Such as - The bus left for northern districts Sunday morning. Or should it be included 'on' when the day includes times? As - The bus left for northern districts on Sunday morning.
1

I also think people omit it in compound sentences (probably because they get lazy). I hear this in conversation, but also in casual online writing.

"Went we out Saturday night, and then had brunch on Sunday morning."

I don't know why, but it feels OK to omit the first 'on' but people usually include the second one.

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 17/08/13

Thank you, Christopher! At least now, I know that native English-speakers omit 'on', and it's normal, especially for casual speech.
1

Using 'on' is always correct, but you're right that it gets omitted sometimes.

I use or hear this a lot:

"Let's go out for dinner Friday night."

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 17/08/13

Thank you, Emily!
1

I think omitting prepositions like "on" before dates is also common in newspaper headlines :)

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 17/08/13

Yes, it's true, Ghadeer :).
1

On is more correct but people become lazy and can leave it out. In Written I would always include it, in Spoken it is less important

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Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 17/08/13

Thank you, Paul! Now, I'm not confused about using or not using 'on' before Monday-Sunday. Thank you!

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