Linguistic Discussion Question

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The film is being released next year/The film is released next year

Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 22/01/19

And one more question from me :).

I know that when we talk about plans we can say, 'I'm visiting my friends on Saturday', but when our plan is more similar to a timetable, we usually say, 'I start my work on Monday'. Which of these two ways is better for the sentence 'The film is (being) released next year.'  And it would be kind of you if you could explain why.


Thank you in advance!

Answers

1

I also prefer "being released" - it indicates intention as well whereas "is released" is just stating a fact

Comments

Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 23/01/19

Thank you, Paul!

1

I think the main difference between your first examples and the question sentence is voice: active vs. passive.

I'm visiting my friends on Saturday.

I'm going to visit my friends on Saturday.

I will visit my friends on Saturday.

I visit my friends on Saturday.  (Though this could also mean habitually.)

All four of the above are good and correct options and could mean exactly the same thing.  The same with the following four:

I'm starting my work on Monday.

I'm going to start my work on Monday.

I will start my work on Monday.

I start my work on Monday.


And so do the following have pretty much the same meaning:

They are releasing the film next year.

They are going to release the film next year.

They will release the film next year.

They release the film next year.


The passive voice versions (with no expressed subject performing the action of releasing) could be:

The film is being released next year.

The film is going to be released next year.

The film will be released next year.

The only one that doesn't work as well for me for talking about the future is:  The film is released next year, probably just because "is released" sounds too much like a reference to the present, at least in my SE Pennsylvania dialect.   If someone were to say it in the course of a conversation, though, I'd understand it, and probably not think anything was wrong or unusual and maybe not even notice.


Comments

Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 22/01/19

Thank you, Richard! It means that when we talk about future plans, it's normal to use the Present Continuous Tense with the Passive Voice? 

Alice Val Alice Val (2) on 22/01/19

Richard, and I just want to thank you once again for your thorough explanation! 

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