Question

Pronouncing "r's in Portuguese?

Yeah, i wanted to know how to pronounce them, since I've heard them pronounced in different ways. Is it different in Brasil and Portugal? It depends on the word? Please I want to know :)

Answers

3

Good answer, Saido.
I'm gonna compare it into Spanish and English, so that you can notice the diferences. Oh, and I'm from Brazil, so this is with a Brazilian accent.
We have two kinds of "R" in Brazilian Portuguese: the hard r and the soft r.

"The hard R"
It appears only between vowels, and it sounds a little more softer than the Spanish R in "peRRo", but it sounds exactly the american t in "buTTer" or d in "reaDer". Spanish speakers, soft your R a little! ;)

"The soft R"
It can appear in different places in a word. It sounds exactly like the English "h"; and, yes, softer than the Spanish J.
It can appear as:
-in the beginning of a word: rato
-in the end of syllable: verde (veR-de), mandar (man-daR)
-between vowels, but written as RR: caRRo (notice that we have the two first cases here: caR-Ro, beginning and end of a syllable)

"The mute R"
You just saw that in the end of a syllable is a soft R. But, in everyday conversations (at least in Brazil), when an R falls into the end of the WORD, we don't pronounce it. See the examples:

-Written: O que você quer comer?
-Spoken: Quê qui ocê qué comê?
"O que" turned into "Quê qui", "você" into "ocê", "quer comer?" into "qué comê?".

You'll get used with it more when you get the chance to speak with a native by Skype or another online chat.

Hope I've helped!

Recordings

Comments

1

The 'r' is pronounced in a few ways even in Brazil, depending on the region. My only experience has been with that of Rio.

If it's at the beginning of the word, there's a pronounced 'h' at the beginning of the sound as the 'r' trails it, "reales (reals, currency);"

If it comes between two vowels, it has a dull 'd' sound, "barato (cheap);"

If it's in the middle, flanked by a vowel and consonant, it's often a soft 'r' where the tip of your tongue barely touches the roof of your mouth as you blow air from your vocal chords, "verde (green);"

If it's a 'rr', it will again have that pronounced 'h' sound as if it were in the beginning, 'terra (earth);'

Recordings

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0

In Portugal the single "r" you can find in words is usually formed with the tip of your tongue and rather soft. (I find it really hard to learn, if your mother tongue doesn't feature the technique)

It seems to be a bit harsher at the beginning of words though.

The double "rr" is formed in the throat, like a harsh "r", almost like the purr of a cat, or like a German persons "r" ;)

Recordings

Comments

0

Good answer, Saido.
I'm gonna compare it into Spanish and English, so that you can notice the diferences. Oh, and I'm from Brazil, so this is with a Brazilian accent.
We have two kinds of "R" in Brazilian Portuguese: the hard r and the soft r.

"The hard R"
It appears only between vowels, and it sounds a little more softer than the Spanish R in "peRRo", but it sounds exactly the american t in "buTTer" or d in "reaDer". Spanish speakers, soft your R a little! ;)

"The soft R"
It can appear in different places in a word. It sounds exactly like the English "h"; and, yes, softer than the Spanish J.
It can appear as:
-in the beginning of a word: rato
-in the end of syllable: verde (veR-de), mandar (man-daR)
-between vowels, but written as RR: caRRo (notice that we have the two first cases here: caR-Ro, beginning and end of a syllable)

"The mute R"
You just saw that in the end of a syllable is a soft R. But, in everyday conversations (at least in Brazil), when an R falls into the end of the WORD, we don't pronounce it. See the examples:

-Written: O que você quer comer?
-Spoken: Quê qui ocê qué comê?
"O que" turned into "Quê qui", "você" into "ocê", "quer comer?" into "qué comê?".

You'll get used with it more when you get the chance to speak with a native by Skype or another online chat.

Hope I've helped!

Recordings

Comments

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