Question

Optional Liaison: Verb + Preposition

Andras Chonn Andras Chonn (1) on 20/10/13

On this page: http://french.about.com/library/pronunciation/bl-liaisons-o.htm , the author writes that liaisons "After Verbs" are not only optional, but "very high register".

This page was written by a non-native speaker, so I would like to have a native speaker here confirm whether or not this type of liaison is "very high register".

For example, would you very rarely here the liaison between "vais" + "au" in "Je vais au restaurant" since you'd find this mostly in a casual situation?

Answers

0

I trust so! I believe that you're generally expected to utilize a liaison after "chez," and as far as anyone is concerned, a contract is prohibited just if it's AFTER a name Research Paper Help. I would twofold check however with another person, however...

Recordings

Comments

0

I have found mistakes in Laura Lawless’s stuff before, perhaps because of her American background, but stick to my answer: I have taught French for 36 years and spend time in France every year. But, by all means, go with what you feel best.

Recordings

Comments

0

I don't think that they mean "high register" in the sens that you understood it. I am as close to a native speaker as you can get without being one: all my education was in French and I'm married to a Frenchwoman.

French people always use the liaisons except in a few circumstances like with "et". Je vais au restaurant - should always have the liaison in my opinion.

Recordings

Comments

Andras Chonn Andras Chonn (1) on 20/10/13

Sorry, but your answer is not correct and is a perfect illustration as to why I am asking for an opinion from a NATIVE speaker. If "French people always use the liaisons except in a few circumstances", then why would Laura Lawless from french.about.com have sections labeled Mandatory Liaisons, Optional Liaisons, and Forbidden Liaisons? Those would be unnecessary (especially the "optional" one) if what you said is correct. Now, I have two non-native speakers with opinions that directly contradict each other. I think I'll trust the information by Laura Lawless since she's been writing lessons for a while, and there are native speakers that make comments in her lessons. Example: go to http://www.forvo.com/word/je_vais_attendre/#fr and listen to the two audio clips. The first one is a man from France pronouncing "Je vais attendre" in two ways: one with a liaison and one without a liaison, illustrating a case where this liaison is NOT mandatory. The second clip is of a man pronouncing it without the liaison. There are other examples as well in Forvo. We may be getting into a realm of prescriptive vs descriptive, but I am interested in the latter: I am not asking if there "should always" be a liaison, but if native speakers actually omit the liaison and to what frequency.

Your Answer