Question

"less than"

Owen Wade Owen Wade (0) on 24/07/13

I know how to say "more than" in Japanese.

She likes dogs more than cats.

Gold costs more than paper.

This watch is more expensive than my house.

Nairobi is less dangerous than Detroit.

But how could I say the same things using "less than"?

eg. She likes cats less than dogs.

Answers

1

1. Nairobi is less dangerous than Detroit.

nairobi は detroit ほど 危険(きけん)ではない

~ほど, ~ではない(じゃない)

or

nairobi は detroit と比(くら)べて、きけんが少ない

~と比べて、~が少ない

2. She likes cats less than dogs.

かのじょは、dogs ほど 、catsが好き では無い

かのじょは、dogs と比べて 、catsへの愛情 が少ない

3. Gold costs more than paper.

金より紙が安い

4. This watch is more expensive than my house.

この家の値段はこの時計よりも高くない。

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Comments

Nate Hill Nate Hill (2) on 29/07/13

I think it's best to use より, even though it tends to give it the feeling of "more than" in Japanese. For example, this seems to be a more normal way of saying the first one: Nairobi は Detroit より安全です。 It seems kind of difficult to keep the nuance of 'less than' in Japanese.

Owen Wade Owen Wade (0) on 04/10/13

Sure. I understand how to make comparisons in Japanese, but was stumped when students asked me to explain how to directly make a "less than" comparison in Japanese from examples in an English textbook. There are ways around this, usually but just switching things and making a "more than" comparison, but the request was for a way to say it without resorting to that. As far as I could tell, there is no easy way to do this, and it looks like Fluently has confirmed that. Thanks, Fluentli.

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