Question

".. because different from .."

Astrid Creuzburg Astrid Creuzburg (1) on 04/09/14

Hey there!

This question is mainly about a habit or an expression I "formed" for myself long ago, but I'm not exactly sure if it's correct to say, or what I could use instead. People seem to understand what I mean, but I think it's horribly wrong, and Google couldn't really provide an answer either. So you're my hope!

The expression, upon comparing something, that I tend to use:

"Because different from toast bread, real bread is more crunchy"

Is it correct to use "different from" in this case, or should I be using something else?

Answers

2

I would say "Because, unlike toasted bread, real bread is more crunchy."

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2
I'll add : toast does not need bread after it. Toast is accepted as toasted bread.

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1

Your sentence seems awkward, but I can't confirm if it's outright wrong or not. But I would say: "Unlike toast bread, real bread is more crunchy".

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0
It is not correct to use "different from" in this case (unfortunately). This is because here, 'different from' implies two things on either side of the phrase, e.g. "Real bread is different from toast bread; it is more crunchy" (to put it another way, the general usage would be SOMETHING IS 'different from' SOMETHING ELSE). The other commenters have correct expressions, but if you wanted to still use 'different from', you could say something like: "Toast is different from bread - it is more crunchy." (bread and toast are two different words in common usage). Or: "Toast differs from bread in that it is more crunchy." if you wanted to use another form of 'different'.

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